Up and over a spiral galaxy – Astronomy Now

July 27, 2019 - Comment

A sharply angled perspective, such because the one proven in Hubble Area Telescope picture of the spiral galaxy NGC 3169, could make it appear as if we, the viewers, are craning our necks to see over a barrier into the galaxy’s brilliant centre. Picture: ESA/Hubble & NASA, L. Ho. Within the case of NGC 3169,


A sharply angled perspective, such because the one proven in Hubble Area Telescope picture of the spiral galaxy NGC 3169, could make it appear as if we, the viewers, are craning our necks to see over a barrier into the galaxy’s brilliant centre.

Picture: ESA/Hubble & NASA, L. Ho.

Within the case of NGC 3169, this barrier is the thick mud embedded inside the galaxy’s spiral arms. Cosmic mud contains a potpourri of particles, together with water ice, hydrocarbons, silicates, and different stable materials. It has many origins and sources, from the leftovers of star and planet formation to molecules modified over thousands and thousands of years by interactions with starlight.

NGC 3169 is positioned about 70 million light-years away within the constellation of Sextans (The Sextant). It’s a part of the Leo I Group of galaxies, which, just like the Native Group that homes our residence galaxy, the Milky Method, is an element of a bigger galactic congregation referred to as the Virgo Supercluster.



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