Rivalling Juno, Hubble snaps gorgeous views of Jupiter – Astronomy Now

August 8, 2019 - Comment

The Hubble House Telescope captured this vibrant view of Jupiter on 27 June from a distance of 645 million kilometres (400 million miles). Picture: NASA, ESA, A. Simon (Goddard House Flight Middle), M.H. Wong (College of California, Berkeley) Photos from NASA’s Juno spacecraft because it orbits Jupiter are unrivalled for the close-up views they supply,



The Hubble House Telescope captured this vibrant view of Jupiter on 27 June from a distance of 645 million kilometres (400 million miles). Picture: NASA, ESA, A. Simon (Goddard House Flight Middle), M.H. Wong (College of California, Berkeley)

Photos from NASA’s Juno spacecraft because it orbits Jupiter are unrivalled for the close-up views they supply, however the Hubble House Telescope nonetheless manages to amaze due to its perch excessive above Earth’s discernible ambiance. As a part of a mission to check adjustments within the atmospheres of the outer planets, Hubble took this exceptional shot of Jupiter on 27 June, at a distance of 644 million kilometres (400 million miles), revealing extra intense colors than seen in earlier years.

“Among the many most putting options within the picture are the wealthy colors of the clouds transferring towards the Nice Pink Spot, a storm rolling counterclockwise between two bands of clouds,” the Hubble mission mentioned in a launch. “These two cloud bands, above and beneath the Nice Pink Spot, are transferring in reverse instructions. The crimson band above and to the appropriate (northeast) of the Nice Pink Spot comprises clouds transferring westward and across the north of the large tempest. The white clouds to the left (southwest) of the storm are transferring eastward to the south of the spot.”

The above video, primarily based on Hubble information, exhibits a full rotation of Jupiter (credit score: NASA, ESA, A. Simon (Goddard House Flight Middle), M.H. Wong (College of California, Berkeley), L. Hustak (STScI).

The Nice Pink Spot has a diameter barely bigger than Earth’s. It’s formed like a marriage cake with an higher haze layer that stretches greater than 5 kilometres (three miles) greater than surrounding clouds. The filaments seen swirling across the big storm are high-altitude clouds being pulled into and round it.

An attention-grabbing element within the Hubble picture is the intense orange look of the huge equatorial cloud band. Researchers say the color may very well be a sign that deeper clouds are beginning to skinny out, emphasising crimson materials within the higher-altitude haze.

The picture, utilizing Hubble’s Huge Area Digital camera three, was captured as a part of the Outer Planets Atmospheres Legacy program, or OPAL.



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