Hubble shoots a Wild Duck (the cluster, that’s) – Astronomy Now

March 29, 2019 - Comment

A favorite goal for beginner astronomers, the Wild Duck Cluster, often known as Messier 11 and, extra formally NGC 6705, is a surprising sight in even small telescopes with its brightest stars forming a “V” form paying homage to a flock of geese. Positioned within the constellation Scutum, the cluster is about 6,200 gentle years


A favorite goal for beginner astronomers, the Wild Duck Cluster, often known as Messier 11 and, extra formally NGC 6705, is a surprising sight in even small telescopes with its brightest stars forming a “V” form paying homage to a flock of geese. Positioned within the constellation Scutum, the cluster is about 6,200 gentle years from Earth and accommodates almost three,000 stars, making it one of many richest and most compact open clusters identified. It was found in 1681 and included in comet-hunter Charles Messier’s well-known catalogue in 1764. This view from the Hubble House Telescope was chosen as “Image of the Week” on the European House Company’s Hubble website.

The Wild Duck Cluster. Picture: ESA/Hubble & NASA, P. Dobbie et al.



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