#astronomy Watch the Moon conceal naked-eye star Zeta (ζ) Tauri on 19 October – Astronomy Now

October 12, 2019 - Comment

Third-magnitude star Zeta (ζ) Tauri is occulted (hidden) by the 19-day-old waning gibbous Moon within the small hours of Saturday, 19 October 2019 as seen from the entire of the British Isles. This illustration exhibits the altering facet of the star’s occultation as seen from London and Edinburgh, clearly demonstrating the impact that geographical latitude has


Third-magnitude star Zeta (ζ) Tauri is occulted (hidden) by the 19-day-old waning gibbous Moon within the small hours of Saturday, 19 October 2019 as seen from the entire of the British Isles. This illustration exhibits the altering facet of the star’s occultation as seen from London and Edinburgh, clearly demonstrating the impact that geographical latitude has on the timing of the occasion. Notice that every one occasions are in British Summer season Time (Common Time + 1 hour). AN graphic by Ade Ashford.When a close-by astronomical physique passes between the observer and a extra distant object, see say that an occultation (from the Latin occulo, ‘to cover’) is going down. For the reason that Moon is our nearest celestial neighbour, it commonly passes in entrance of planets and stars.

Though not one of the 4 first-magnitude zodiacal stars – Aldebaran in Taurus, Regulus in Leo, Spica in Virgo and Antares in Scorpius – is hidden by the Moon this 12 months, planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn are all topic to lunar occultation in 2019. (Jupiter is subsequent for the British Isles, occulted by the Moon in daylight on 28 November.)

Fainter stars are clearly extra plentiful and the Moon has already occulted many of those thus far this 12 months. Happily for observers within the British Isles and Northwestern Europe, the brightest naked-eye star topic to a lunar occultation this month is third-magnitude Zeta (ζTauri within the small UK hours of Saturday, 19 October. See the illustration above for timings of the star’s disappearance and reappearance as seen from London and Edinburgh.

As with all occultation observations, just remember to are prepared on the eyepiece of your telescope a couple of minutes earlier than the appointed occasions to make sure success, notably if you happen to dwell far from the cities talked about. The Moon’s west-to-east movement towards the background stars – at a fee equal to its personal diameter each hour – is especially evident when an occultation is about to happen and fairly spectacular when a conspicuous star or planet disappears/reappears on the Moon’s darkish limb.



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