#astronomy Very Giant Telescope catches star-forming area “pink handed” – Astronomy Now

January 26, 2020 - Comment

Intense ultraviolet radiation from newly fashioned stars can ionise surrounding hydrogen gasoline, stripping away electrons and inflicting the gasoline to emit a faint pinkish glow. The European Southern Observatory’s Very Giant Telescope, utilizing the FORS instrument, captured that glow in an emission nebula identified Gum 26, a star-forming area some 20,000 gentle years away within


Intense ultraviolet radiation from newly fashioned stars can ionise surrounding hydrogen gasoline, stripping away electrons and inflicting the gasoline to emit a faint pinkish glow. The European Southern Observatory’s Very Giant Telescope, utilizing the FORS instrument, captured that glow in an emission nebula identified Gum 26, a star-forming area some 20,000 gentle years away within the southern constellation Vela. By catching such stars “pink handed,” ESO says in a press release, astronomers can study extra in regards to the circumstances by which stars type and the way such stellar nurseries affect their environments. This picture of Gum 26 was captured as a part of the ESO Cosmic Gems programme to provide pictures of particularly fascinating objects for training and public outreach.

Picture: ESO



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