#astronomy September Climate in Armagh – Astronotes

October 4, 2019 - Comment

MILD, WET SEPTEMBER WITH ABOUT AVERAGE SUNSHINE Armagh Observatory, 1st October 2019: Armagh Observatory experiences that September 2019 was hotter and wetter than common, with about common sunshine. This was the sunniest September at Armagh for 4 years, the warmest for 3 years and the wettest for 2 years. The imply temperature was 13.91 levels


MILD, WET SEPTEMBER WITH ABOUT AVERAGE SUNSHINE

Armagh Observatory, 1st October 2019:

Armagh Observatory experiences that September 2019 was hotter and wetter than common, with about common sunshine. This was the sunniest September at Armagh for 4 years, the warmest for 3 years and the wettest for 2 years.

The imply temperature was 13.91 levels Celsius (57.zero Fahrenheit), roughly 1.four C hotter than the long-term (1796–2010) common September temperature at Armagh and almost zero.7 C hotter than the latest (1981–2010) 30-year September common.

The warmest day (highest most air temperature) was 22.three C (72.1 F), which occurred on the 21st, adopted by 22.1 C on the 19th and 21.6 C on the 20th. The coldest day (lowest most air temperature) was 12.5 C on the 30th. The warmest evening (highest minimal air temperature) was 14.7 C on the 22nd, and the coldest evening (lowest minimal air temperature) was 6.three C on the 18th. There have been three floor frosts (grass minimal temperature lower than or equal to zero Celsius), the coldest of which was -1.2 C on the 10th.

Complete September precipitation was 76.25 mm (three.00 inches), together with 1 hint worth (i.e. 76.20 mm if hint values are ignored). That is roughly 10% greater than the long-term (1838–2010) common September precipitation at Armagh and 12% greater than the latest (1981–2010) 30-year September common at Armagh. The wettest day was the 30th with 20.2 mm (zero.80 inches) of rainfall, adopted by 12.1 mm on the 21st.

It’s fascinating to document moon halo was famous on the night of the 13th and a vivid double rainbow on the afternoon of the 26th. Fieldfares had been seen on the 2nd of the month, in contrast with the 14th September the earlier 12 months. A lone seagull was observed flying over the Observatory grounds on the 22nd.

A complete of 117.eight hours of robust sunshine had been recorded through the month, which is roughly three% fewer than the long-term (1881–2010) common variety of hours of robust September sunshine at Armagh and three% greater than the latest (1981– 2010) 30-year common. This was the sunniest September at Armagh for 4 years. The sunniest day, with 10.6 hours of robust sunshine, was the 20th, adopted by 10.three hours on the 17th.

These knowledge seek advice from observations at Armagh Observatory, which has been recording the climate at Armagh since 1795. For additional info, please contact: Professor Mark E. Bailey, Emeritus Director of Armagh Observatory, Armagh Observatory and Planetarium, School Hill, Armagh, BT61 9DG, Tel: 028-3752-2928, E-mail: mark.bailey@armagh.ac.uk



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