#astronomy See the Moon buzz the Beehive Cluster within the small hours of 12 January – Astronomy Now

January 9, 2020 - Comment

Observers within the UK with a transparent sky excessive to the south-southeast shortly after midnight on Sunday, 12 January 2020 can see the 16-day-old waning gibbous Moon simply three-quarters of a level north of the gorgeous open star cluster Messier 44, in any other case often known as Praesepe, or the Beehive Cluster. AN graphic by Ade


Observers within the UK with a transparent sky excessive to the south-southeast shortly after midnight on Sunday, 12 January 2020 can see the 16-day-old waning gibbous Moon simply three-quarters of a level north of the gorgeous open star cluster Messier 44, in any other case often known as Praesepe, or the Beehive Cluster. AN graphic by Ade Ashford.For those who personal a pair of binoculars or a small telescope, you might want to try the Moon on the evening of 11–12 January 2020 because it lies within the constellation of Most cancers, the Crab. For those who look slightly extra intently, you’ll see that the Moon lies in the identical area of view as the wonderful open star cluster often known as Praesepe, the Beehive Cluster, or extra prosaically as Messier 44.

For observers within the British Isles, the Moon’s orbital movement doesn’t carry it closest to the Beehive Cluster till the calendar clicks onto 12 January, by which era the pair are excessive within the south-southeast. At their closest – 12:30am GMT (00:30 UT) – the 16-day-old waning gibbous Moon lies simply three-quarters of a level north of the center of Praesepe. In a telescope, use your lowest magnification eyepiece and watch because the Moon glides over the northern fringe of M44, occulting (passing in entrance of) numerous its fainter stars.



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