#astronomy Perseus Molecular Cloud involves life in Spitzer picture – Astronomy Now

December 28, 2019 - Comment

Earlier than NASA’s Spitzer House Telescope ran out of liquid helium coolant in 2009, it captured beautiful infrared views of targets starting from galaxies to nebulae and all the pieces in between. Throughout the so-called “chilly part” of its prolonged mission, the observatory studied the Perseus Molecular Cloud on a number of events, capturing spectacular


Earlier than NASA’s Spitzer House Telescope ran out of liquid helium coolant in 2009, it captured beautiful infrared views of targets starting from galaxies to nebulae and all the pieces in between. Throughout the so-called “chilly part” of its prolonged mission, the observatory studied the Perseus Molecular Cloud on a number of events, capturing spectacular views of huge mud clouds with embedded star clusters. A few of these clusters pose a thriller: they appear to include younger, middle-age and outdated stars in shut proximity. Older stars have a tendency to maneuver aside as time passes and discovering such closely-packed suns in a mix of ages is out of step with present concepts about how stars kind. Says astrophysicist Luisa Rebull: “This area is telling astronomers that there’s one thing we don’t perceive about star formation. It’s certainly one of my favourite areas to review.”

The Perseus Molecular Cloud. Picture: NASA/JPL-Caltech



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