#astronomy Junocam captures beautiful view of Io’s shadow throughout Jovian eclipse – Astronomy Now

September 18, 2019 - Comment

Generations of beginner astronomers have loved watching the shadows of Jupiter’s Galilean moons periodically sweep throughout the large planet’s cloud tops as they go in entrance of the Solar. These “shadow transits” are clearly seen reminders of the clockwork nature of the photo voltaic system, simply loved with even modest telescopes. However from its perch


Generations of beginner astronomers have loved watching the shadows of Jupiter’s Galilean moons periodically sweep throughout the large planet’s cloud tops as they go in entrance of the Solar. These “shadow transits” are clearly seen reminders of the clockwork nature of the photo voltaic system, simply loved with even modest telescopes. However from its perch in polar orbit round Jupiter, NASA’s Juno spacecraft offers a hen’s eye view of the massive planet’s cloud tops that’s unmatched by even the biggest telescopes on Earth. In June, the spacecraft’s Junocam instrument captured spectacular views of Io’s shadow because the volcanic moon moved into eclipse, producing a jet black, sharply outlined “spot” atop the turbulent ambiance. Junocam is a public outreach digital camera, offering information to citizen scientists who then course of the photographs seen right here. Launched in August 2011, Juno is designed to review Jupiter’s inside construction, gravity and magnetic/radiation setting. The spacecraft braked into orbit round Jupiter in July 2016.

Picture: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Björn Jónsson

 

Picture: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/AstroHD

 

Picture: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/David Marriott

 

 

 



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