#astronomy Face-on spiral galaxy showcases a number of supernova blasts – Astronomy Now

December 5, 2019 - Comment

Supernova explosions happen when large stars run out of nuclear gasoline, collapse and explode in titanic blasts seen throughout the cosmos. In addition they could be triggered when a white dwarf in a binary star system siphons off sufficient mass from a companion to ignite runaway nuclear fusion in its core to start the supernova


Supernova explosions happen when large stars run out of nuclear gasoline, collapse and explode in titanic blasts seen throughout the cosmos. In addition they could be triggered when a white dwarf in a binary star system siphons off sufficient mass from a companion to ignite runaway nuclear fusion in its core to start the supernova course of. Each varieties of supernovae have been noticed in a galaxy generally known as NGC 5468, a spectacular face-on spiral whose orientation makes it simpler to identify such exploding stars. Over the previous 20 years, NGC 5468, situated some 130 million gentle years from Earth within the constellation Virgo, has hosted a minimum of 5 supernovae: SN 1999cp, SN 2002cr, SN2002ed, SN2005P, and SN2018dfg.

The spiral galaxy NGC 5468 presents a face-on view as seen on this picture from the Hubble House Telescope, giving astronomers the chance to look at a number of supernova blasts. Picture: ESA/Hubble & NASA, W. Li et al.



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