A wealthy globular lurking within the shadow of a extra well-known sibling – Astronomy Now

May 27, 2019 - Comment

When newbie astronomers flip their telescopes towards Hercules, the standard goal is Messier 13, one of many brightest, easiest-to-find globular clusters within the northern sky. However a stone’s throw away is one other shiny companion – M92 – that runs an in depth second, containing some 330,000 stars orbiting the Milky Manner’s core at a


When newbie astronomers flip their telescopes towards Hercules, the standard goal is Messier 13, one of many brightest, easiest-to-find globular clusters within the northern sky. However a stone’s throw away is one other shiny companion – M92 – that runs an in depth second, containing some 330,000 stars orbiting the Milky Manner’s core at a distance of 33,000 mild years. Seen to the unaided eye below darkish sky circumstances, M92 was found by Johann Elert Bode in 1777. 4 years later, Charles Messier noticed it and added the cluster to his well-known catalogue. Neither man may have imagined the splendour revealed by the Hubble Area Telescope as seen on this gorgeous view.

Messier 92. Picture: ESA/Hubble & NASA Acknowledgement: Gilles Chapdelaine



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